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09b. The Structure of the Federal Courts
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Even though the Founders surely intended that Congress hold a great deal of power over the judicial branch, in reality the basic organization of federal courts has remained basically the same throughout U.S. history. Congress has created new courts and reorganized others, and the system has grown increasingly complex. The courts have a great deal of independence, however, and they have established the judicial branch as a strong coequal to Congress and the president.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
Date Added:
04/27/2022
12c. Who Pays for Education?
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CC BY
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Public education is the single largest expenditure for state and local governments across the nation. Yet it is arguably the most criticized. Many people charge that public schools are faltering and that American academic achievements are far behind those in other countries. In recent years, many states and localities have experimented with improving public schools.

Subject:
Finance
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
American Government
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Advanced Workshop in Writing for Social Sciences and Architecture (ELS), Spring 2007
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Advanced subject focusing on techniques, format, and prose style used in academic and professional life. Emphasis on writing as required in fields such as economics, political science, and architecture. Short assignments include: business letters, memos, and proposals that lead toward a written term project. Methods designed to deal with the special problems of those whose first language is not English. Successful completion satisfies Phase II of the Writing Requirement. This workshop is designed to help you write clearly, accurately and effectively in both an academic and a professional environment. In class, we analyze various forms of writing and address problems common to advanced speakers of English. We will often read one another's work.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Civil War, Spring 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Common Sense Education: Deep Fakes and Democracy Lesson
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Common Sense Education has created the Deep Fakes and Democracy lesson plan to educate students on how misinformation influences the Democratic process. Common Sense also has a broader section on Hoaxes and Fakes in the Common Sense K-12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/hoaxes-and-fakes

**This resource is published by Common Sense Education as part of The Common Sense K-12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Date Added:
09/14/2022
Cyber Society
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This resource is published by cyber.org.Cyber Society is a resource that explores how cyber affects our everyday lives and how to become more educated members of our cyber society. The content lives on an LMS that is maintained by CYBER.ORG. This link will take you to an informational page where you can request access to the rest of the content.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Cyber Citizenship Initiative
Date Added:
03/29/2022
Free Speech Rights in School – The Civil Rights Litigation Schoolhouse
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CC BY-NC
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This unit asks students to consider the permissible restrictions schools can place on students’ freedom of speech, as they learn about the (fictional, but realistic) case of Davis v. Ann Arbor School Board. Students will either conduct a mock negotiation in which they will try to resolve a First Amendment-related conflict between a student and his public high school, or a mock argument in which they will argue for one side in front of a panel of student judges.

This Unit contains 9 lessons:
Lesson 1: Are schools permitted to limit students’ First Amendment freedom of speech?
Lesson 2: Under what circumstances may a school punish student speech?
Lesson 3: How does the law apply to our case?
Lesson 4: What are the key elements of negotiation?
Lesson 5: How can parties use negotiation to achieve the best solution?
Lesson 6: Is negotiation an effective tool in the legal process?
Lesson 7: What is a mock argument?
Lesson 8: How do I prepare for a mock argument?
Lesson 9: How do attorneys conduct oral arguments to advocate for their clients?

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
General Law
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Gender Equality in Public Education – The Civil Rights Litigation Schoolhouse
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CC BY-NC
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Through most of U.S. history, women had limited access to educational programs and extracurricular activities. Most women were excluded from elite academic institutions, and those schools that accepted female applicants required them to have higher test scores and grades than their male counterparts. In the 1960s and 1970s, civil rights activists advocated for federal enforcement of equal opportunities for male and female students. In response, Congress enacted Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. This unit asks students to consider the scope and application of Title IX through the examination of statutory text, federal regulations, enforcement policies, and court decisions. Students are guided to confront questions about how the provisions of Title IX ensure nondiscrimination on the basis of gender, and to think about what sex equality means across different contexts.

This unit contains 5 lessons:
Lesson 1: Conceptualizing Equality and Non-Discrimination
Lesson 2: Analyzing Title IX and Athletics
Lesson 3: Applying Title IX Beyond Sports
Lesson 4: Applying Title IX
Lesson 5: Reshaping Title IX

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
General Law
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Case Study
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Info-luencer: Media Literacy and Civics
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CC BY-NC
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This resource includes multiple lesson plans developed by Washington State teacher John Zingale and can be taught as part of in-person, hybrid, or remote instructional settings. The core content areas include social studies, civics, and media literacy and are designed for use with students in grades 6-12. Additional integrations include ELA, world languages, mathematics, physical education and science. These lessons integrate both state and national civics instruction using project-based and collaborative learning strategies. Features of these lessons include:student researchcollaborative learningdigital learning strategieslateral readingdesign and creation of infographicsTo support these lessons, additional resources are provided to help educators and families with understanding and teaching information and media literacy to young people. Resources include:introductions to media literacyeducator guidesparent guidesstudent learning standards

Subject:
Graphic Arts
Education
Educational Technology
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Author:
Mark Ray
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Media Literacy Now Website
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Media Literacy Now leverages the passion and resources of the media literacy community to inform and drive policy change at local, state, and national levels in the U.S. to ensure all K-12 students are taught media literacy so that they become confident and competent media consumers and creators. (Media Literacy Now, 2022)

Subject:
Education
Political Science
Material Type:
Reading
Date Added:
07/13/2022
Organizations and Environments, Fall 2004
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Examines theory and research on the relationship of organizations to each other and to their economic, political, and social environments. Classic and contemporary approaches to complex social systems, the dynamics of inertia and change, the role of legitimacy, and the production of change as an intended or unintended consequence. Considers the relative roles of voluntarism and determinism in the pursuit of organizational agendas and in the shaping of organizational environments, for example, with respect to changing employment relationships and environmentalism. Primarily for doctoral students. The goal of this doctoral course is to familiarize students with major conceptual frameworks, debates, and developments in contemporary organization theory. This is an inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry drawing primarily from sociology, and secondarily from economics, psychology, anthropology, and political science. The course focuses on inter-organizational processes, and also addresses the economic, institutional and cultural contexts that organizations must face. This is an introduction to a vast and multifaceted domain of inquiry. Due to time limitations, this course will touch lightly on many important topics, and neglect others entirely; its design resembles more a map than an encyclopedia. Also, given the focus on theoretical matters, methodological issues will move to the background. Empirical material will be used to illustrate how knowledge is produced from a particular standpoint and trying to answer particular questions, leaving the bulk of the discussion on quantitative and qualitative procedures to seminars such as 15.347, 15.348, and the like.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Anthropology
Economics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Prisoners’ Rights Mock Trial – The Civil Rights Litigation Schoolhouse
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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This unit asks students to consider civil rights inside the prison as they conduct a mock trial. By participating in a mock trial, students will not only learn about the litigation process, but will also learn about how democratic values and principles can be applied to specific situations, why people disagree on when and how they should be applied, and how the courts are important in providing a forum for contestation and resolution of such disputes and in ensuring that our commonly held values and principles are protected.

This Unit contains 6 lessons:
Lesson 1: What is this case about?
Lesson 2: Understanding the Evidence
Lesson 3: Developing an Outline for the Case
Lesson 4: Preparing for Trial
Lesson 5: The Trial
Lesson 6: Debrief and Reflection

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
General Law
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Unit of Study
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Propaganda & Animal Farm
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CC BY-NC
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This unit is designed to accompany the study of George Orwell's Animal Farm. Resources encourage students to recognize a variety of propaganda techniques and to connect those techniques to media that they can find in their everyday lives. Resources also help students to understand the historical uses of propaganda by governments and political parties to influence public opinion. Resources can be used independently of the novel.

Subject:
Graphic Arts
Literature
Communication
Graphic Design
Composition and Rhetoric
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Author:
Shana Ferguson
Date Added:
04/06/2022
Teaching For Democracy Alliance - Resource List
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CC BY-NC-ND
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**This resource is published by Teaching for Democracy Alliance.The resource includes teaching about elections and voting assessment matrix, checklist for schools and district leaders, and downloadable documents for educators and administrators.

Subject:
Information Science
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Author:
Cyber Citizenship Initiative
Date Added:
03/29/2022
Verifying Social Media Posts
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CC BY
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 Verifying social media posts is quickly becoming a necessary endeavor in everyday life, let alone in the world of education. Social media has moved beyond a digital world which connects with friends and family and has become a quick and easy way to access news, information, and human interest stories from around the world. As this state of media has become the "new normal," especially for our younger generations, we, educators, find ourselves charged with a new task of teaching our students how to interact with and safely consume digital information.The following three modules are designed to be used as stand-alone activities or combined as one unit, in which the lessons can be taught in any order. "Who Said What?!" is a module focusing on author verification. "A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words'' is a module devoted to image verification. "Getting the Facts Straight" is a module designed to dive into information verification. Lastly, there are assessment suggestions to be utilized after completing all three modules.

Subject:
Journalism
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
World History
Cultural Geography
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Sandra Stroup
Date Added:
04/07/2022