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Australian Aboriginal Art and Storytelling
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CC BY
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Australian Aboriginal art is one of the oldest continuing art traditions in the world. Much of the most important knowledge of aboriginal society was conveyed through different kinds of storytelling—including narratives that were spoken, performed as dances or songs, and those that were painted. In this lesson students will learn about the Aboriginal storytelling tradition through the spoken word and through visual culture. They will have the opportunity to hear stories of the Dreamtime told by the Aboriginal people, as well as to investigate Aboriginal storytelling in contemporary dot paintings.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
04/27/2022
The Beatles, Lesson 1: The Beatles Work Towards Success
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CC BY-NC-SA
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"A lot of people thought we were an overnight sensation," says The Beatles' Paul McCartney in The Beatles: Eight Days a Week “The Touring Years," "but they were wrong." Indeed, though to many fans The Beatles seem to have been a big bang, bursting from Liverpudlian obscurity to international stardom with their 1963 debut album Please Please Me, quite the opposite is true. Between 1960-63, The Beatles worked. They were, after all, young men from the working classes of Liverpool, a city still recovering from World War II. They worked to earn money for basic necessities, playing pub sets both day and night and performing lengthy residencies in Hamburg, Germany, one of which included a stretch of 104 consecutive shows. They worked on repertoire, learning dozens of "cover" songs spanning several genres. They worked on their group sound, playing several sets a night and fine tuning the skills that helped them "hold" audiences at the dance floor, even those who may not have come specifically to see them.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Book 1, Birth of Rock. Chapter 10, Lesson 4: Rock and Roll Goes To the Movies
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson, students assume the role of entertainment industry professionals responsible for marketing a selection of movies from the early Rock and Roll era. Following an examination of trailers, posters, newspaper articles, and the Motion Picture Production Code of 1930, students will present to the class on the various stakeholders that helped shape the way Rock and Roll culture was introduced to mainstream movie audiences in the 1950s.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Book 2, Teenage Rebellion. Chapter 10, Lesson 1: Latin Music in Postwar New York City
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This lesson focuses on Latin American immigration to New York City during the late 1940s and 50s and the effect it had on popular culture. Students investigate a 1940 U.S. Department of Agriculture film about Puerto Rico, a graph containing immigration data, an interview with bandleader Tito Puente, an array of clips featuring Latin dance music, and both mainstream Pop songs and Broadway showtunes revealing the "Latin tinge." As students examine these resources, they will consider and discuss the roles Latino artists played in bringing a Latin feel to American popular culture.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Book 5, Music Across Classrooms: English Language Arts. Chapter 2, Lesson 1: Heroes and Mortals in "Something Just Like This"
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson, students use the lyrics to "Something Like This" as an opportunity to learn the stories of Achilles, Hercules, Wonder Woman and Superman. Students will explore similarities between these gods and superheroes, finally considering why mortals still need superhumans, thousands of years later.

Subject:
Performing Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Book 5, Music Across Classrooms: English Language Arts. Chapter 5, Lesson 1: New Perspectives on the Great Gatsby's Daisy Buchanan
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson, students will explore these questions, comparing Lana Del Rey's "Young and Beautiful" with chapters 1-7 of The Great Gatsby to form their own characterization of Daisy. Students will view the music video for "Young and Beautiful" and analyze advertisements and headlines from 1918-1922 to consider the potential influence of cultural values and gender expectations on women like Daisy. Finally, using excerpts from the novel, the song, and the advertisements, students will work in groups to create an identity chart for Daisy.

Subject:
Performing Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
04/27/2022
FOCUS ON "HENRY V"
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CC BY-NC-SA
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"Focus on 'Henry V'" is a peer-reviewed, multimedia, digital Open Educational Resource co-authored and co-produced by faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates on the innovative digital publishing platform Scalar. Chapters include guides to early printed editions, sources, and performance and cinematic histories of the play, as well as teaching resources and in-depth case-studies of particular scenes. All chapters include rich multimedia and audio recordings of body text and image captions. In addition to a traditional Table of Contents, the digital book allows users to navigate the materials through multiple pathways and visualizations. In this way the book offers not only a cutting-edge, renewable OER for college and K-12 teachers but also a model for maximizing the affordances of the digital medium.

Subject:
Literature
Performing Arts
World Cultures
Electronic Technology
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Case Study
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Student Guide
Textbook
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Season Storytelling Activity
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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An activity that allows students to explore the words, images, sounds, and movements that represent the season of their birth. Activity incluedes photos taken of arts educators performing during ISKME's OER and Arts Education workshops, Fall 2009.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
ISKME
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Shakespeare, Film and Media, Fall 2002
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Investigates relationships between the two media, including film adaptations as well as works linked by genre, topic, and style. Explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political, and aesthetic boundaries. Topic for Fall: Shakespeare, Film, and Media. Meets with CMS.840, but assignments differ. Filmed Shakespeare began in 1899, with Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree performing the death scene from King John for the camera. Sarah Bernhardt, who had played Hamlet a number of times in her long career, filmed the duel scene for the Paris Exposition of 1900. In the era of silent film (1895-1929) several hundred Shakespeare films were made in England, France Germany and the United States, Even without the spoken word, Shakespeare was popular in the new medium. The first half-century of sound included many of the most highly regarded Shakespeare films, among them -- Laurence Olivier's Hamlet and Henry V, Orson Welles' Othello and Chimes at Midnight, Kurosawa's Throne of Blood, Polanski's Macbeth and Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet. We are now in the midst of an extremely rich and varied period for Shakespeare on film which began with the release of Kenneth Branagh's Henry V in 1989 and includes such films as Richard Loncraine's Richard III, Julie Taymor's Titus, Zeffirelli and Almereyda's Hamlet films, Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet, and Shakespeare in Love. The phenomenon of filmed Shakespeare raises many questions for literary and media studies about adaptation, authorship, the status of "classic" texts and their variant forms, the role of Shakespeare in youth and popular culture, and the transition from manuscript, book and stage to the modern medium of film and its recent digitally inflected forms. Most of our work will involve individual and group analysis of the "film text" -- that is, of specific sequences in the films, aided by videotape, DVD, the Shakespeare Electronic Archive (http://shea.mit.edu), and some of the software tools for video annoatation developed by the MIT Shakespeare Project under the MIT-Microsoft iCampus Initiative. We will study the films as works of art in their own right, and try to understand the means -- literary, dramatic, performative, cinematic -- by which they engage audiences and create meaning. With Shakespeare film as example, we will discuss how stories cross time, culture and media, and reflect on the benefits as well as the limitations of such migration. The class will be conducted as a structured discussion, punctuated by student presentations and "mini-lectures" by the instructor. Students will introduce discussions, prepare clips and examples, and the major "written" work will take the form of presentations to the class and multimedia annotations as well as conventional short essays. The methodological bias of the class is close "reading" of both text and film. This is a class in which your insights will form a major part of the work and will be the basis of a large fraction of class discussion. You will need to read carefully, to watch and listen to the films carefully, and develop effective ways of conveying your ideas to the class.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Soundtracks: Songs That Defined History, Lesson 2. #BlackLivesMatter: Music in a Movement
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson. students will read statements from Black Lives Matter and watch a clip from CNN's Soundtracks to explore the significance of the movement and the music made in response to the issues they rally behind. Students will also analyze clips from the music videos of artists Kendrick Lamar and Beyonce Knowles-Carter to understand music's relation to the Black Lives Matter movement.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
04/27/2022