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10th Grade ELA: Information Fluency
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In this unit, students will understand where “fake news” comes from, why it exists and how they can think like fact checkers to become fluent consumers, evaluators, and creators of information. They will apply this knowledge by selecting a controversial topic to evaluate, synthesize, and analyze all aspects before sharing with a local audience.

Subject:
Journalism
Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
04/27/2022
3.4.1 How do Historians Study the Past?
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The Roadmap is a remix of Michigan Open Book, MC3 and GIANTS all in one place. This foundational lesson introduces students to historical reasoning through the analysis of primary sources, such as historical maps and photographs. They examine how historians are detectives of the past and use evidence from primary and secondary sources. Students then explore the chronology of the settlement of a village in Michigan and identify the causes and effects of the founding of the community.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
IMLC
Provider Set:
Collabrify Roadmap Center
Date Added:
04/27/2022
"Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday" Cross-Curricular Activity
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This is a cross-curricular activity that uses the story Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday to practice money and decimal skills in addition to reading and writing skills. After reading or hearing the story, students will complete the attached worksheet. (If it's read aloud, students would need a way to refer back to the story to answer the questions. The worksheet has a mixture of reading and math questions. It can be edited if you choose. It can be used for either 3rd or 4th grade. With slight modifications, it could also be used for middle school EL students to learn about currency.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
04/27/2022
American Revolution
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In this unit students continue the exploration of factors that influence change by examining the events that led up to the American Revolution. Over the course of the unit, students will build a deeper understanding of the significant ideas and values at the heart of the American Revolution, what drove the colonists to seek independence, and how conflict between England and the colonists ultimately influenced change in our country. Students will see the American Revolution from multiple perspectives, starting with analyzing the difference in perspectives between the British and the colonists and how each side’s actions often instigated each other. Students will also explore how class structure influenced colonists perspectives. Later in the unit, students will think about the perspectives of black people, women and Native Americans who were forced to choose a side and why they may have had a different point of view of the events of the revolution.

An important part of this unit is pushing students to focus on seeing history from multiple different perspectives. The core text Liberty! How the Revolutionary War Began offers one perspective on events, however, the prespective is limited to that held by white elite colonists. Therefore, students also read excerpts from A Young People's History of the United States in order to build a deeper understanding of all sides of the Revolution.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Analyzing and Evaluating Media Lesson
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The goal for this unit is to have students analyze a variety of sources on a current events subject of their interest, identify the different perspectives, and defend their own position.This is one lesson from a larger unit on Evaluating Media. This unit will also cover identifying credible sources, analyzing fake news and the role of propaganda, identifying the different ways news is communicated in different communities. This unit will take place in the beginning of the school year to help instill evaluative and critical thinking research skills as we discuss and explore our big ideas throughout the school year. The end goal is to have students create a digital resource for their topic that we can share out as an educational tool for others. We’ll be creating a padlet that links to all of their presentations (students will have their choice in medium, as long as it is digital) that we will share with our school community and ideally can connect and share with other schools and students. There is also a possibility of using PenPalSchools to share out final resources, but that would depend on getting approval from the district to utilize that website.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Chelsea Leonard
Date Added:
03/29/2022
Ancient Civilizations Roadmap Collaborative Activities View (revised)
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This particular roadmap features all of the COLLABORATIVE designed activities for the "Ancient Civilizations Roadmap Unit View (revised)" resource. You could distribute this roadmap to students for work that they complete synchronously with partner(s) as part of their learning path in the unit map.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language Education (ESL)
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Ancient Rome
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In this unit students explore the rise and fall of the ancient Roman Empire. Over the course of the unit, students learn about different characteristics of the Roman Empire, what lead to the Empire’s growth and success, and what eventually lead to the Empire’s demise. Through learning about the daily routines, structures, and rituals of the Roman Empire, students will be challenged to draw conclusions about what the civilization valued and how those values compare to societal values today. This unit builds onto the 2nd grade nonfiction unit on ancient Greece, in which students began to think about how the daily routines, structures, and rituals of a civilization show what they value. This unit, in conjunction with the second grade unit on ancient Greece, will help students understand early influences in the world and the first republics.

The mentor texts for this unit, Ancient Rome and Pompeii: A Nonfiction Companion to Magic Tree House and Eye Wonder: Ancient Rome, allow students to practice multiple informational reading strategies in two very different text structures. In both texts, but predominately in Eye Wonder, students will practice using a multitude of text features and illustrations as a way of learning new information about a topic. Over the course of this unit, students will constantly be thinking about how the information from one text builds on and connects to the information in the other text. Then at the end of the unit, students will be asked to critically analyze the similarities and differences between the two texts.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Artists, Information Literacy & Climate Change
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This unit explores the various ways information and ideas about climate change are presented through a variety of media. This includes the evaluation of social media posts, research into climate change issues, and an exploration of contemporary art and artists. This was designed and taught in an honors 9th grade English Language Arts Classroom by Dr. Tavia Quaid in response to student interest in climate change and to reinforce key information literacy skills.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Visual Arts
Environmental Studies
Reading Informational Text
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Shana Ferguson
Date Added:
03/29/2022
Assessment: Claims on Social Media
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Social media sites, like Twitter, are filled with individuals and groups seeking to further their agendas. In order to navigate this sea of information, students need to be able to weigh the relative strengths and weaknesses of tweets as sources of information. This task assesses students’ ability to consider the source of a tweet and the information contained in it en route to describing what makes it both a useful and less useful source of information.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Claims on Twitter
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​​​​​​Social media is rife with specious claims, and students often struggle to decide whether such claims are sound. This task asks students to evaluate the merits of a tweet that makes a claim about gun ownership and provides a link to an article as evidence.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Claims on YouTube
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Videos are a powerful, popular, and increasingly easy way to make and spread arguments about policy topics. Compelling footage and authoritative narration may make students tempted to trust such videos. In this task, students watch a short video and explain why they might not trust a video that makes a contentious claim.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Comments Section
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As news websites have proliferated, their comments sections have emerged as forums for civic discourse. This task presents students with an online comment from "Joe Smith" and taps their ability to reason about the factors that make a comment more or less trustworthy.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Comparing Articles
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As native advertisements proliferate, students need to look beyond surface features like vivid graphics and learn to carefully evaluate sources of information. In this task, students are presented with links to two articles from the same online news outlet and asked which is a more reliable source. Students must identify who is behind the articles and consider potential conflicts of interest in order to successfully evaluate the articles.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Evaluating Data
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Infographics and charts can be useful tools in helping us understand complex information and data, but they can also be used to deceive. Students need to move beyond surface-level evaluations and think critically about what is presented and who is presenting it. In this assessment, students are asked to examine two digital graphics and determine which provides better evidence. In order to answer successfully, students must evaluate the source of each graphic.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
05/23/2022
Assessment: Evaluating Evidence
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Given the vast amount of information available online, students need to be able to distinguish between legitimate and dubious evidence. This assessment measures whether students can evaluate evidence when it takes the form of a vivid photograph.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Home Page Analysis
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Many news organizations have turned to native advertising as a source of revenue. By definition, native advertising tries to sell or promote a product in the guise of a news story. This makes it difficult for unsuspecting readers to know if and when there is an ulterior motive behind the information they encounter. This task assesses students’ ability to distinguish between an article and an advertisement.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: News Search
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In order for students to effectively navigate the news, they need to understand the differences between news stories and opinion columns. This task assesses a student’s ability to recognize and differentiate news and opinion articles in an online format.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
05/23/2022
Assessment: News on Twitter
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Twitter has become a powerful source of information about breaking news. Surveys show that young people increasingly rely on it for news about events as they unfold in real time. But it’s not always easy to distinguish a tweet that’s based on a legitimate source from one that relies on hearsay. This assessment taps a student’s ability to assess the trustworthiness of different kinds of tweets.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
05/23/2022
Assessment: Researching a Claim
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When young people want to find out more about a topic or question, they often turn to Google. But open Internet searches routinely turn up contradictory results that mix fact with falsehood. Making sense of search results is even more challenging with politically loaded topics. This task asks students to perform an open search about a controversial figure in order to assess their ability to wade through information to find sources, evidence, and arguments that they trust.

Subject:
Computing and Information
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Sponsored Content
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When reading any online source, students need to ask: Who is behind this information? This task assesses students' ability to recognize that an article is sponsored and address why that might make it less reliable.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Assessment: Website Reliability
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The Internet teems with websites seeking to advance specific political agendas while concealing their true intent, identity, or backers. These sites often have high production values and the trappings of legitimacy (e.g., boards of directors, links to academic studies, even 501(c)(3) status). In this digital task, students are asked to evaluate such a website.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Building Background Knowledge: Frogs and the Research Process
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In Unit 2, students will build their ability to read and understand informational text and begin to build their knowledge of frogs through closely reading excerpts of the informational text Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures. Students will use the information gained in reading these excerpts to help them write answers to the questions generated in Unit 1 after reading poems and narratives about frogs. For a mid-unit assessment, students will demonstrate their reading skills through reading a new text about reptiles and amphibians, and they will gather information to answer a research question.
In the second half of the unit, students will continue with the same central text and build their knowledge by studying three "freaky frogs" that have specific adaptations according to where they live: the glass frog, the Amazon horned frog, and the water-holding frog. They will read about these frogs to answer this question in an informative paragraph: How does where a frog lives affect how it looks and/or acts? In the End of Unit 2 Assessment, students read another excerpt of text about the poison dart frog, gather information to answer a research question, and write an on-demand informative paragraph to answer the question.
RI.3.1, RI.3.3, RI.3.4, RI.3.5, RI.3.7, RI.3.8, W.3.2, W.3.7, W.3.8, L.3.1d,e, L.3.4

Subject:
Elementary Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Informational Text
Zoology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
04/27/2022
CTE Architecture: Framing a House
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This task was developed by high school and postsecondary mathematics and design/pre-construction educators, and validated by content experts in the Common Core State Standards in mathematics and the National Career Clusters Knowledge & Skills Statements. It was developed with the purpose of demonstrating how the Common Core and CTE Knowledge & Skills Statements can be integrated into classroom learning - and to provide classroom teachers with a truly authentic task for either mathematics or CTE courses.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Mathematics
Geometry
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/27/2022
CTE Architecture: Framing a House
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This task was developed by high school and postsecondary mathematics and design/pre-construction educators, and validated by content experts in the Common Core State Standards in mathematics and the National Career Clusters Knowledge & Skills Statements. It was developed with the purpose of demonstrating how the Common Core and CTE Knowledge & Skills Statements can be integrated into classroom learning - and to provide classroom teachers with a truly authentic task for either mathematics or CTE courses.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Geometry
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/27/2022
CTE Architecture: Stairway
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This task was developed by high school and postsecondary mathematics and design/pre-construction educators, and validated by content experts in the Common Core State Standards in mathematics and the National Career Clusters Knowledge & Skills Statements. It was developed with the purpose of demonstrating how the Common Core and CTE Knowledge & Skills Statements can be integrated into classroom learning - and to provide classroom teachers with a truly authentic task for either mathematics or CTE courses.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Algebra
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Cinderella Stories
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In this first unit of second grade, students read multiple versions of a classic fairy tale, Cinderella. Through reading various versions of the same story, students are not only exposed to a wide variety of cultures, but they are also challenged to think about how the culture, or setting, of the story influences the plot. In first grade fiction, students took a trip around the world, exploring a wide variety of themes and stories from all over, in order to build a foundational understanding that our world is made up of many diverse and unique cultures. This unit builds on the exposure to new cultures students received in first grade and provides an opportunity for students to explore the idea that even though cultures may appear to be different, there are many things embedded within the unique characteristics of different cultures that make them similar. Storytelling, and the role of storytelling, is one of those similarities. It is our hope that this unit, in connection with others in the sequence, helps students build empathy and understanding of the world around them.

The different versions of Cinderella help students understand the components of a fairy tale and the lessons associated with traditional fairy tales. Over the course of the unit, students will be challenged to ask and answer questions about the text and illustrations as a way of deepening their understanding of plot, setting, and characters. In the first section of the unit, students will focus deeply on the setting, characters, and plot of the different versions of Cinderella, learning to compare and contrast the nuances across different versions. In the second section of the unit, students will read Cinderella stories that vary from the traditional plot structure but still include the underlying theme that a person’s actions (good or bad) influence his/her life outcomes. In this section students will dive deeply into three texts to analyze different characters’ traits and how the author uses those traits to help reveal the lesson of the story.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Click Restraint
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When we have a question or are searching for sources, we likely turn to a search engine to help us find answers. We often click on the first result—perhaps because sifting through all the results takes time, or because we assume the first result is the most trustworthy. But the first result is not always the best place to start. Spending a little more time scanning search results can help us make a more informed choice about where to go first.

This lesson introduces students to click restraint, a strategy that involves resisting the urge to immediately click on the first search result. Instead, students scan the results to make a more informed choice about where to go first.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Journalism
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Stanford University
Provider Set:
Civic Online Reasoning
Author:
Civic Online Reasoning
Date Added:
04/01/2022
Culminating Activity – Reading/Writing Identity (Open Up Resources - bookworms - Grade 2 ELA Lesson Plans)
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Week 36, Day 1---Day 5
Culminating Activity: Reading and Writing Identity
Memoir: Special memories about a person, place, object or time
"The memoir you will be writing will be a reflection of how you have changed as a reader and writer this year. It’s going to be like a year in review, so you will create a mini book as part of the memoir project.
Some of you may be thinking that this is the same as a personal narrative, but memoirs are more about looking back and thinking about how things have changed over time just like we did at the beginning of class. Narratives tell a story, but memoirs show how the event was meaningful to the author’s life. Also, memoirs are only snapshots. They don’t include the person’s whole life. Now I will add the characteristics of memoirs to the chart.
Use 1st person
Use true descriptions of actual events
Describe any problems faced by the author
Include the author’s feelings about the situation or event
*Narrative Graphic Organizer

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Deepfakes: Exploring Media Manipulation
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Students examine what deepfakes are and consider the deeper civic and ethical implications of deepfake technology. In an age of easy image manipulation, this lesson fosters critical thinking skills that empower students to question how we can mitigate the impact of doctored media content. This lesson plan includes a slide deck and brainstorm sheet for classroom use.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Digital Age Skill: Language Arts - What Makes a Hero
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This is a lesson using Digital Age Skills in Language Arts. The lesson refers to a documentary about Rosa Parks. This lesson could be taught using any documentary as an anchor text. The outcome of the lesson is for students to produce a documentary of their own based on a hero in their lives.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Digital Literacy Lesson Plan
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Hyperdoc playlist of activities for digital literacy lesson. Teacher will need to populate the "Guided Practice" section with updated links to current events. Check out The Sift from the News Literacy Project to get ides.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/27/2022